5:50 pm - Mon, Jan 7, 2013

CNU 21: Living Community Registration Now Open

Registration for CNU 21: Living Community is now OPEN. Take advantage of our Early Bird rates by signing up before April 24th, 2013.

CNU 21 Living Community will be held in gorgeous downtown Salt Lake City , May 29 - June 1, 2013. Living Community balances the demands of physical, social, economic, and environmental values by connecting people to place and awakening in us a stewardship for our land and each other.

Stewardship is tangible. It is measured by how well we care for the people around us, the places we make and the land that hosts us. This year’s Congress will delve into these issues, contemplate the role of cities within nature and place within cities.

Join Plenary Speakers Richard Louv, Sarah Susanka, Chuck Marohn, Andres Duany, and many, many more at CNU 21. Register today!image

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4:15 pm - Mon, Oct 1, 2012

Wanted: Artwork for CNU Charter Book

Want to get published in the new CNU Charter Book (McGraw-Hill, 2013)? 

Give us your best shot! (or drawing, illustration, rendering, etc). 
Please include a short caption: what principle does your photo/illustration show?
Email to: Emily Talen, CNU Charter Book editor, etalen@gmail.com
Deadline: November 1, 2012
Resolution: at least 300 dpi at target size
Black and white only (you can submit color, but they will be converted to B&W). Please only submit your own material or material for which you have (or can easily obtain) the copyright.
Thank you!

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11:19 am - Mon, Jul 30, 2012

Cleveland’s Health-Tech Corridor boasts multiple modes of transit - from bike lanes to BRT. The article documents the rise in BRT ridership and the value of connected, multimodal streets.

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3:15 pm - Tue, Jul 24, 2012
The solutions to health disparities “really lie within the domain of community development,” argues David Williams, a Robert Wood Johnson senior fellow. And yet, despite the place-based nature of health, it often goes unrecognized how much community development has contributed to better health outcomes for low-income people.

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11:57 am - Thu, Jul 5, 2012
By providing several million dollars in seed money, the hospital has helped take the abandoned and dilapidated housing surrounding it and renovated it back to living standards. Originally, the program hoped to flip between 40 and 60 houses by 2013.

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4:50 pm - Tue, Jun 19, 2012
While serving as Senior Program Officer at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Kate Kraft contributed to setting up the successful New Jersey FIT: Future In Transportation program at the New Jersey Department of Transportation. She currently works as a Community Health and Wellness Consultant and serves on the board of the Rails-toTrails-Conservancy. Kate is an expert on community health, Active Living, and behavior change. She spoke with us at PPS about her views on biking and walking and where she feels the future of community health and transportation are headed.

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11:26 am - Fri, Jun 8, 2012

Sustainable Installation Planning (via Videos | National Capital Planning Commission)

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12:35 pm - Thu, Jun 7, 2012
Rattling off several morose U.S. statistics—like the doubled rate of diabetes in the last 15 years—Jackson describes a “profound decline in the fitness of Americans,” and blames, in large part, the environments we’ve created. “In many ways, it’s because we’ve taken people’s legs away from them,” he says. “Most people can’t buy a carton of milk without getting in the car.”

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1:44 pm - Fri, May 25, 2012
Why did I go to CNU 20? I have been hearing more and more about how urban design can be a force to improve public health. But this message has not yet gained traction in the way hospitals are designed and built, despite architects like me trying to get the word out about the disconnect and to bring some of the healthy city thinking into healthcare planning. I was at CNU to be a part of a new initiative called Health Districts. The goal is to develop a framework for the design of hospitals that would encourage a better interface with their surrounding communities. The Health District workshops presented some diverse and promising perspectives from architects and urban designers, as well as representatives of the health systems themselves and NGO advocates.

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1:04 pm - Mon, May 21, 2012
Research has linked the growing obesity epidemic to inactivity caused by poor land use and transportation choices. Transportation and planning professionals are now joining the ranks of public health professionals to find solutions. Across the region, local officials are taking this to heart. Obesity is a serious problem in the U.S. When planners shape land use or transportation options, they’re determining the potential health of the community, because these options affect whether people can choose effective transit or safe walking and bicycle routes.

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